Injured Bald Eagle returned safely to the wild

<p>Rose Augustine (left), a wildlife keeper at Willowbrook, and Rob Negrete, a wildlife control staff member for Stickney Township, watch as the eagle takes flight. Negrete and Oak Lawn Police animal control officer Barry Adamczyk (not pictured) worked to bring the bird to Willowbrook and both were present to assist at the release.  |  Courtesy Forest Preserve District of DuPage County</p>

Rose Augustine (left), a wildlife keeper at Willowbrook, and Rob Negrete, a wildlife control staff member for Stickney Township, watch as the eagle takes flight. Negrete and Oak Lawn Police animal control officer Barry Adamczyk (not pictured) worked to bring the bird to Willowbrook and both were present to assist at the release.  |  Courtesy Forest Preserve District of DuPage County

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County’s Willowbrook Wildlife Center has released an injured Bald Eagle back into the wild. Read the full release below.

An injured bald eagle from Oak Lawn has overcome a broken wing and returned to the wild with the help of the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County’s Willowbrook Wildlife Center.
 
“This bird had unfortunately sustained a gunshot wound, and once that injury was treated the eagle started to regain health and made good progress through all phases of rehabilitation,” says Rose Augustine, an animal care staff member at Willowbrook.
 
An Oak Lawn resident noticed the distressed bird in his backyard in late February. Animal control officers brought it to Willowbrook, one of the few places in the region that can care for wild birds of prey. During surgery on the bird’s wing, Dr. Jen Nevis, Willowbrook’s staff veterinarian, found no signs of infection and only had to place a few stiches. The bird moved through a series of larger enclosures as its injury healed and it became safe for it to once again use its wing. It spent it final weeks of care in Willowbrook’s specialized raptor flight enclosure, which provides a space where birds can rehabilitate in spacious but protected outdoor environment. The space provides recovering birds of prey with a 100-foot circular flight path to strengthen their muscles and allows care providers to ensure that birds can carry out all of the movements necessary for life back in the wild.

 

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