Transportation: More people moving to Naperville for easier commute

John Greene Realtor Michael Odeh said that in north Naperville most houses are only on the market for a week or two before selling. Any homes listed below $500,000 are seeing a pretty quick turn around, too.  |  Courtesy of Kelly C. Janek
John Greene Realtor Michael Odeh said that in north Naperville most houses are only on the market for a week or two before selling. Any homes listed below $500,000 are seeing a pretty quick turn around, too. | Courtesy of Kelly C. Janek

Beginning in April 2014, a group of very lucky city employees in Gothenburg, Sweden, were selected to work a six-hour day as part of a yearlong study. Other rather unfortunate colleagues “were selected” to continue to work the standard 40-hour week. All will be given the same pay.

A similar experiment already was conducted in a Gothenburg car factory. The results were encouraging. Employees working shorter work spans actually were very productive. The architects behind the test are hoping to increase productivity while reducing employee sick days.

For many of us, moving to Sweden is an unlikely option to improve our quality of life.

However, based on a 2012-2013 U.S. Census Bureau study, a hefty portion of us, 36 million Americans, moved between 2012 and 2013.

The largest group of moves occurred for new, better or cheaper housing. The second most popular reason for moving was related to family issues, followed by employment changes.

In addition, 5 percent said they moved to be closer to work or to make their commute easier. In 1999, only 3 percent of Americans moved for a shorter or easier commute.

“The schools always have been a great draw for families to come to Naperville,” John Greene Realtor Michael Odeh said.

In north Naperville, he said most houses are only on the market for a week or two before selling. A couple of years ago, it was a very different scenario.

Any homes listed below $500,000 are seeing a pretty quick turn around, he added.

In addition to seeing more corporate relocations, Odeh said, more people who have lived in a nearby community are relocating to Naperville. Those who always wanted to be a part of the community for its amenities such as proximity to trains and expressways, festivals and parks are making the move here, he added.

No word whether relocations have been impacted by Naperville’s national ranking as one of the most snobby mid-size towns.

With our excellent schools and other amenities, this is unlikely to happen. After all the study was done in jest and gained some awesome attention for the online real estate brokerage, Movoto.

Most of the criteria for the most-snobby study — median home prices, household income, and a high majority of the population with college degrees — don’t exactly correlate to snobiness; neither does performing arts centers, art galleries and few fast-food restaurants.

City leaders have joked about the title — after all we are lucky enough to have a mayor who was once “officer friendly.” But let’s face it; out in the trenches of suburban living in anywhere USA we all have come across a snob or two.

Will the ranking attract more snobs to Naperville, I hope not. Maybe, they will move to Sweden. There they might have more time to be pretentious, since they will be working less.

Cathy Janek, who has lived in Naperville since 1986, writes about transportation in the city. To offer comments and tips, email her at cathymjanek@gmail.com.

Tags:

0 Comments




Modal