Residents signing up for new recycling carts

A display at the 95th Street Library shows the variety of sizes available to Naperville residents taking part in the city's new recycling cart program. Unless residents request one of the smaller vessels or opt out of the program entirely, they will receive the 96-gallon version in coming weeks. | Susan Frick Carlman/Sun-Times Media
A display at the 95th Street Library shows the variety of sizes available to Naperville residents taking part in the city's new recycling cart program. Unless residents request one of the smaller vessels or opt out of the program entirely, they will receive the 96-gallon version in coming weeks. | Susan Frick Carlman/Sun-Times Media
Susan Frick Carlman
scarlman@stmedianetwork.com | @scarlman
July 22 4:25 p.m.
What’s it take?

Here are the materials accepted for curbside pickup through Naperville’s municipal recycling program.

Newspaper
Advertisements
Junk mail
Magazines
Catalogs
Phone books
Books (notebooks, novels, hard or soft textbooks; however, residents are encouraged to donate items in good condition)
Office paper
Post-It Notes™
Gift wrap
Paper bags
Chipboard boxes (such as gift boxes, tissue boxes and cereal boxes)
Corrugated cardboard boxes, including frozen food boxes*
Glass bottles and jars
Aluminum cans, foil and trays
Tin or steel cans, including empty aerosol cans and paint cans
Plastic containers numbered #1 through #7 (except #6, polystyrene)
Plastic 6-pack rings
Milk cartons and drink boxes
Shredded paper (in clear plastic bags only)

*Very large (major appliance-sized) boxes can be flattened and left at the curb alongside the collection bin.

Wheeled recycling carts with lids on top will soon be rolling into Naperville. When that happens, the rectangular bins now used to hold materials for collection at the curb will have to hit the road.

The new blue vessels will be similar in shape but colored differently from the rolling bins now used to dispose of regular trash. They will come with a $3 surcharge that will appear on residents’ monthly bills for a year, to help offset their $1.87 million cost.

City staff have said the agreement to purchase the carts came with a guarantee that the current $2.43 monthly recycling fee paid by the city for each customer will remain in effect for the next five years.

Residents can opt out of recycling and avoid the up-charge if they like. They also can request one of the 64- or 32-gallon containers offered as alternatives to the 96-gallon vessel. They have until Aug. 1 to specify their preferences in reply to the postcards that were mailed earlier this month by Republic Services, the hauler contracted to collect recyclables.

Samples of the variously sized containers are on display at the Municipal Center, 400 S. Eagle St.; the Public Works Department, 180 Fort Hill Drive; and at all three Naperville Public Library locations though July 31.

“We have taken over 1,000 order calls and there are approximately 2,000 web orders,” city spokeswoman Linda LaCloche said Monday in an email, adding that the city must be contacted by the deadline via phone at 630-420-6095, by mail or online.

The 22-gallon blue bins now in use for collecting cardboard, paper, plastic and metal for processing will no longer be emptied at the curb after the new carts are put into use this fall.

The city is making the move partly to encourage more recycling. Naperville’s diversion rate — the term describing the portion of municipal refuse separated for processing — has waned in recent years and now lags behind neighboring communities. The city aims for a diversion rate of 40 percent, but data gathered in 2011 found less than 30 percent of the city’s solid waste was detoured from landfills — and the rate has continued to fall since then. City households recycled an average of 66 pounds monthly in 2013, which was 7 percent less than the amount two years earlier.

Recycling is nothing new to city residents. Naperville was the state’s first municipality to offer curbside collection when it began the service in 1986, after opening a drop-off recycling center near Ogden Avenue and Fifth Avenue six years earlier.

More information about the recycling program, and the ability to request an opt-out or a smaller cart, can be found at www.naperville.il.us/curbsiderecycling.aspx.

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What’s it take?

Here are the materials accepted for curbside pickup through Naperville’s municipal recycling program.

Newspaper
Advertisements
Junk mail
Magazines
Catalogs
Phone books
Books (notebooks, novels, hard or soft textbooks; however, residents are encouraged to donate items in good condition)
Office paper
Post-It Notes™
Gift wrap
Paper bags
Chipboard boxes (such as gift boxes, tissue boxes and cereal boxes)
Corrugated cardboard boxes, including frozen food boxes*
Glass bottles and jars
Aluminum cans, foil and trays
Tin or steel cans, including empty aerosol cans and paint cans
Plastic containers numbered #1 through #7 (except #6, polystyrene)
Plastic 6-pack rings
Milk cartons and drink boxes
Shredded paper (in clear plastic bags only)

*Very large (major appliance-sized) boxes can be flattened and left at the curb alongside the collection bin.

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